About Chemical Engineering at U of T

U of T regularly ranks as the best university in Canada to study chemical engineering and offers one of the top programs in the world. In your upper years, you'll have a chance to participate in the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering's Minors and Certificates, and explore the Department's eight research clusters: Biomolecular & Biomedical Engineering; Bioprocess Engineering; Chemical & Material Process Engineering; Environmental Science & Engineering; Informatics; Pulp & Paper; Surface & Interface Engineering; and Sustainable Energy.

In The News

The invisible clean-up crew: Engineering microbial cultures to destroy pollutants - U of T engineering professor Elizabeth Edwards is internationally recognized for using biotechnology to clean up industrial solvents in soil and groundwater. Her technique earned her the prestigious Killam Prize in 2016 and has already been used to restore more than 500 sites around the world. One way to decontaminate industrial sites involves digging up... Read more »
ChemE team invents double-fortified salt to improve nutrition for 24 million in Uttar Pradesh - Double-fortified salt (DFS) is now being distributed to 4.6 million families — representing more than 24 million people — in the state of Uttar Pradesh, India. The product, developed at U of T Engineering, provides a simple, effective way to add iron in the diets of people who don’t currently get enough. “We’re very excited... Read more »
Call for applications: LOT Awards - The objective of these Leaders of Tomorrow (LOT) Awards is to recognize students in Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry who have shown the potential to become outstanding leaders.  This potential may be demonstrated in a number of ways, including participation in student councils or clubs, community organizations, cultural groups, or athletics. Applicants should enumerate their... Read more »
Diesel trains may expose passengers to exhaust - Measurements taken by U of T Engineering researchers from the Southern Ontario Centre for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (SOCAAR) show that levels of certain airborne particles can be up to nine times higher in train cars pulled by diesel locomotives than on busy city streets. Read full story from: U of T Engineering News Toronto Star
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